Every creature builds itself a nest or digs a lair in which to live. Only humans also build temples. And only humans paint icons and compose poems. Art, somehow removed from the practical demands of everyday life, reveals that our kinship is not with the biological world only; it is also with the spiritual world - Irina Yazykova, Icons as a Witness to Eternity. 

The icon reveals to us the true image of humanity transfigured and deified; it is the image of the kingdom of heaven, the kingdom that is to come and that will restore the harmony that is now marred by sin – Irina Yazykova, Hidden and Triumphant: The Underground Struggle to Save Russian Iconography (2010).

The icons of Our Lady of Longmeadow and Saint Michael the Archangel

The icons I recently completed of Our Lady of Longmeadow and Saint Michael have been featured in the galleries at Fine Art America (FAA). The icon of Our Lady of Longmeadow which can now be found at Saint Mary’s Parish Church, Longmeadow, Massachusetts, USA, has been featured in the Christian Art, Christian Theme Artwork, Madonna and Women Painters galleries. The icon of Saint Michael which can now be found at the parish church of San Michele Arcangelo a Pietralata, Rome, Italy, has been featured in the Angel Paintings, Christian Theme Artwork and All FAA Artwork galleries.

Icon of Saint Michael the Archangel

Archangel Michael HRThe icon of Saint Michael that I had completed earlier this year can now be found at the parish church of San Michele Arcangelo a Pietralata, Rome, Italy. I will post pictures of the new home of the icon when I receive them.

The dimensions of the icon were 20cm x 30cm. It was written in traditional egg tempera with natural pigments on linen-covered gessoed wood, gilded with 23.5 kt gold leaf burnished by hand, varnished with olifa upon completion.

The icon of Our Lady of Longmeadow

Our Lady of LongmeadowThe icon of Our Lady of Longmeadow that I just completed. It was written at Clare Priory, Suffolk, UK and in Santa Venera, Malta, in 2014 under the supervision of Fr. Richard G. Cannuli. The story behind this icon can be found here.

Dimensions of the icon were 11″ x 14″. Materials included linen-covered wood with natural gesso, 23.5 kt gold leaf burnished by hand, natural egg tempera in the Russian-Byzantine tradition, varnished with olifa upon completion.

The icon will be blessed and installed in its intended home at Saint Mary’s Parish Church, Longmeadow, MA later next month.

Can Satan mimic peace? Response to a question

The question was asked, “Can Satan mimic peace?” The answer is in the negative. Peace is the one quality that Satan cannot mimic because he has none of his own to give. Only God can give peace – true peace – as He is order and peace in Himself.

Drawing for the icon of Saint Martial

MartialTo the left is my pencil drawing for the icon of Saint Martial, the adopted son of Saint Peter. As a young, unwanted orphan, Martial was adopted together with his sister by Peter and his wife through the direct intervention of the Virgin Mary with Her Son, Jesus Christ. Martial was flogged and died as a young martyr in Rome before Peter was crucified.

Icon of the Holy Face of Christ

Panel icon written in Santa Venera, Malta, in 2013 and completed at Clare Priory, Suffolk, UK, in 2014, under the supervision of Fr. Richard G. Cannuli, O.S.A. Dimensions are 8″ x 9.5″.

Materials included linen-covered wood with natural gesso, 23.5 kt gold leaf burnished by hand, natural egg tempera applied in the Russian-Byzantine tradition, varnished with olifa upon completion.

The icon was blessed at Clare during the vigil liturgy of the Solemnity of the Ascension. It is now in the private possession of a Roman Catholic couple in the US.

On iconography

“The iconographer’s vision belongs to her person, her time, to human vision, to our history, to humanity… ultimately to language and art, to logos and eikon. When she paints, she stands in the midst of all the iconographers that ever lived, her hand and theirs draws a line as it has always be drawn” (C. Tsakiridou, 2014).

Why we were made

We were made not for ourselves but for God, to love Him intimately as He so intensely desires that we allow Him to similarly love us. But many of us have forgotten why we were made. We think we were created for ourselves – our own aims, goals and benefits – but such thoughts are erroneous. We were made for God, to live in Him, through Him, to the full capacities of our beings.