Unity of the Divine and Sacred Hearts

Photo: Alexei Boitsov

God the Almighty Father leads us to Jesus Christ in the same manner that Christ leads us to the Father. The Savior said, “Everyone whom the Father gives Me will come to Me” (Jn 6:37) and “No one can come to Me unless drawn by the Father who sent Me” (Jn 6:44). Thus, not only does Christ lead us without fail to the Almighty Father, but for those who might go directly to the Father Himself, they will inevitably be led back by the Father to His Son so that they can be raised up: “Those whom You took from the world to give Me. They were Yours and You gave them to Me” (Jn 17:6) and “No one can come to the Father except through Me” (Jn 14:6).

This process of return occurs because we cannot be in the Divine Heart of the Father without being at the same time in the Sacred Heart of Jesus. The core of the Father’s Divine Heart is one with the Son’s Sacred Heart in and through the unity of the Holy Spirit: “The Father and I are one,” said Christ (Jn 10:30), and “the Father is in Me and I am in the Father” (Jn 10:38, 14:11); “Father, You are in Me and I am in You” (Jn 17:21). It is precisely to reconcile us with the Heavenly Father and reopen up the path to deification that Christ became man over 2000 years ago. This is illustrated in the Gospel of John, whereby Christ points us toward and shows us the Face and Will of the Eternal Father (Jn 12:44-50).

 

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Pope Francis and the Magisterium of the Church

Read my article on Medium about Pope Francis, the Catholic Faith, and the Magisterium of the Church.

A propos du Nom du Père de Jacques Lacan: Christianity v. psychology

god-the-father-1779-by-pompeo-girolamo-batoniMany have often claimed that the difference between Freud’s neurotic symptom and Lacan’s sinthome, in those who have traversed fantasy, is nothing more than lucidity and assent. However, is such a claim really true?

Freud considered the neurotic symptom an unwelcome act or acts that were, at the least, useless in the life of an individual and, at the most, harmful. The symptom was a substitute for instinctual satisfaction that had been repressed and claimed considerable psychic energy from the individual in its formation, manifestation, and maintenance. Lacan initially considered the sinthome to be the symptom, spelled out in its original form. However, he later redefined the sinthome as the fourth ring of the Borromean knot, and which held together the three orders of the Real, the Imaginary, and the Symbolic that formed the structure both of the world and of the individual. The sinthome came to be largely regarded as the paternal metaphor – the nom du père [name of the father] or noms du père [names of the father] that replaced the father of Freud’s Oedipus complex, with the sinthome par excellence being the Nom du Père – the Name of the (Eternal) Father. But was God the Father no more than a symptom or a metaphor for Lacan – as so many desire Him to be, to this day?  Continue reading “A propos du Nom du Père de Jacques Lacan: Christianity v. psychology”

Was Christ a narcissist or not? Christianity v. psychology

Jesus ChristUsing Christ as the epitome of the martyr, some have attempted to define the Christian martyr as a first-class egotistical, fanatical narcissist for whom nothing else counts except the unbrokenness – the unfragmented purity and integrity, if you will – of the self-image. This attitude and disposition was termed “extraordinary.” The Christian martyr was also defined as starving of all natural desire, to attain this unattainable fantasy-based goal.

In the attempt, however, to explain the martyrdom of Christ’s human nature from within such a weak – starving – purported viewpoint of psychology, these writers failed, intentionally or otherwise, to consider five basic facts (four of them spiritual) that cannot be reduced to mere psychologizations. These facts are that

  1. Christ was the only-begotten Son of God (the Father);
  2. The difference between image and likeness in the nature of mankind;
  3. The ontology of the extraordinary;
  4. The natural desires experienced by Christ the Man; and
  5. The real reason He died on the Cross.

Specifically, Christ was not just a Man, but also the Son of God the Eternal Father. As such, unlike the rest of mankind (common man), Christ did not have just a human nature and a human will, but also a divine nature and the Divine Will. Although He deliberately divested Himself of His divine nature at the very instance of His human conception.  Continue reading “Was Christ a narcissist or not? Christianity v. psychology”

Icon drawing of Christ with Joseph the Patriarch

Christ & Joseph iconHere is the basic drawing of another icon that I am presently working on. It is a panel icon of Jesus Christ with Joseph, the Patriarch of the Old Testament.

The divine essence and energies of God

The divine essence means the unknowable ground of divinity; the divine energies are those aspects of the divine life that are directed away from the Godhead itself, like rays emanating from the sun. It is through the divine energies that the act of creation is accomplished and that God is revealed and known as the Holy Trinity – J. Baggley, Doors of Perception.

The icon of the Holy Face

The icon of the Holy Face that I recently completed has now been featured in the Catholic Art, Christian Theme Artwork and Premium FAA Artists galleries at Fine Art America.

God is faithful love

God is faithful love and He never tires of helping us, even in all our mundane activities, when we offer the day to Him and allow Him to participate.

Icon of the Holy Face of Christ

Panel icon written in Santa Venera, Malta, in 2013 and completed at Clare Priory, Suffolk, UK, in 2014, under the supervision of Fr. Richard G. Cannuli, O.S.A. Dimensions are 8″ x 9.5″.

Materials included linen-covered wood with natural gesso, 23.5 kt gold leaf burnished by hand, natural egg tempera applied in the Russian-Byzantine tradition, varnished with olifa upon completion.

The icon was blessed at Clare during the vigil liturgy of the Solemnity of the Ascension. It is now in the private possession of a Roman Catholic couple in the US.

Why we were made

We were made not for ourselves but for God, to love Him intimately as He so intensely desires that we allow Him to similarly love us. But many of us have forgotten why we were made. We think we were created for ourselves – our own aims, goals and benefits – but such thoughts are erroneous. We were made for God, to live in Him, through Him, to the full capacities of our beings.