Advent and Christmas – 4

Theo Gold bulb2“Today is made known the mystery that existed before the foundation of the world. The Son of God becomes the Son of Man, so that he may share in what is worse in order to enable me to share in what is better. Adam once was deceived: He longed without success to become God.  Now God becomes human to make Adam god. Let creation rejoice, Let nature exult: In awe the archangel approaches the Virgin, conveys her the greeting, our sorrow’s consoling. Glory to you, O God, Who in merciful compassion became a human being” (from Vespers of the 5th Saturday of Lent).

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Advent and Christmas – 3

christ child“O man, for your sake was Christ born, and the Son of God came that He might make you to live; He became a babe, He became a child, and He became a man, being (at the same time) God in His Nature, and the Son of God.

He Who was the Lawgiver became a reader, and He took the Book in the synagogue, and read, saying, ‘The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me, therefore He has anointed Me, and has sent Me to preach the Gospel to the poor (Lk 4:18)” (from Paradise of the Holy Fathers).

Advent and Christmas – 2

Theo Gold bulb2“The Lord, the Word of God, came down to earth and was incarnate of the Holy Spirit and Mary the Virgin and became man, without change becoming our equal in all things save sin, so that, traversing all that which is ours, He might re-forge and make that first man anew and, through him, all of us who were begotten and came into being from him and are like him who engendered us.  Since, because Adam who engendered us had become corruptible and mortal—and, I will add, deaf and blind – and, by reason of his transgression, both naked and insensible of his divine vesture, such being the man of dust, so as well have they all become who were born of him: of dust, corruptible, mortal, deaf, blind, naked and insensible, differing in no way from the irrational animals or, better, become even worse than the beasts as having embraced all the latter’s’ passions and taken them into themselves” (Saint Symeon the New Theologian).

 

Advent and Christmas – 1

The christmas ceremony in the orthodox Russian Church of Maria Magdalene in the foot of Mount of Olives in Jerusalem“With the God-man Christ, all that is God’s has become man’s, human, ours, so that each of us individually and all of us assembled together in the Divine-human body of Christ, the Church, might become god-men, having attained ‘to the perfect man, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ’ (Eph 4:12-13).   Therefore Christmas, the day of the birth of the God-man, the Lord Jesus Christ, is the greatest and most important day in the history of all the worlds in which man moves and lives” (Saint Nikolai Velimirovich).

 

On truth – 1

Truth is not a thought, not a word, not a relationship between things, not a law. Truth is a Person. It is a Being which exceeds all beings and gives life to all. If you seek truth with love and for the sake of love, she will reveal the light of His face to you inasmuch as you are able to bear it without being burned (Saint Nicholas of Serbia).

Unity of the Divine and Sacred Hearts

Photo: Alexei Boitsov

God the Almighty Father leads us to Jesus Christ in the same manner that Christ leads us to the Father. The Savior said, “Everyone whom the Father gives Me will come to Me” (Jn 6:37) and “No one can come to Me unless drawn by the Father who sent Me” (Jn 6:44). Thus, not only does Christ lead us without fail to the Almighty Father, but for those who might go directly to the Father Himself, they will inevitably be led back by the Father to His Son so that they can be raised up: “Those whom You took from the world to give Me. They were Yours and You gave them to Me” (Jn 17:6) and “No one can come to the Father except through Me” (Jn 14:6).

This process of return occurs because we cannot be in the Divine Heart of the Father without being at the same time in the Sacred Heart of Jesus. The core of the Father’s Divine Heart is one with the Son’s Sacred Heart in and through the unity of the Holy Spirit: “The Father and I are one,” said Christ (Jn 10:30), and “the Father is in Me and I am in the Father” (Jn 10:38, 14:11); “Father, You are in Me and I am in You” (Jn 17:21). It is precisely to reconcile us with the Heavenly Father and reopen up the path to deification that Christ became man over 2000 years ago. This is illustrated in the Gospel of John, whereby Christ points us toward and shows us the Face and Will of the Eternal Father (Jn 12:44-50).

 

Pope Francis and the Magisterium of the Church

Read my article on Medium about Pope Francis, the Catholic Faith, and the Magisterium of the Church.

A propos du Nom du Père de Jacques Lacan: Christianity v. psychology

god-the-father-1779-by-pompeo-girolamo-batoniMany have often claimed that the difference between Freud’s neurotic symptom and Lacan’s sinthome, in those who have traversed fantasy, is nothing more than lucidity and assent. However, is such a claim really true?

Freud considered the neurotic symptom an unwelcome act or acts that were, at the least, useless in the life of an individual and, at the most, harmful. The symptom was a substitute for instinctual satisfaction that had been repressed and claimed considerable psychic energy from the individual in its formation, manifestation, and maintenance. Lacan initially considered the sinthome to be the symptom, spelled out in its original form. However, he later redefined the sinthome as the fourth ring of the Borromean knot, and which held together the three orders of the Real, the Imaginary, and the Symbolic that formed the structure both of the world and of the individual. The sinthome came to be largely regarded as the paternal metaphor – the nom du père [name of the father] or noms du père [names of the father] that replaced the father of Freud’s Oedipus complex, with the sinthome par excellence being the Nom du Père – the Name of the (Eternal) Father. But was God the Father no more than a symptom or a metaphor for Lacan – as so many desire Him to be, to this day?  Continue reading “A propos du Nom du Père de Jacques Lacan: Christianity v. psychology”

Was Christ a narcissist or not? Christianity v. psychology

Jesus ChristUsing Christ as the epitome of the martyr, some have attempted to define the Christian martyr as a first-class egotistical, fanatical narcissist for whom nothing else counts except the unbrokenness – the unfragmented purity and integrity, if you will – of the self-image. This attitude and disposition was termed “extraordinary.” The Christian martyr was also defined as starving of all natural desire, to attain this unattainable fantasy-based goal.

In the attempt, however, to explain the martyrdom of Christ’s human nature from within such a weak – starving – purported viewpoint of psychology, these writers failed, intentionally or otherwise, to consider five basic facts (four of them spiritual) that cannot be reduced to mere psychologizations. These facts are that

  1. Christ was the only-begotten Son of God (the Father);
  2. The difference between image and likeness in the nature of mankind;
  3. The ontology of the extraordinary;
  4. The natural desires experienced by Christ the Man; and
  5. The real reason He died on the Cross.

Specifically, Christ was not just a Man, but also the Son of God the Eternal Father. As such, unlike the rest of mankind (common man), Christ did not have just a human nature and a human will, but also a divine nature and the Divine Will. Although He deliberately divested Himself of His divine nature at the very instance of His human conception.  Continue reading “Was Christ a narcissist or not? Christianity v. psychology”

Icon drawing of Christ with Joseph the Patriarch

Christ & Joseph iconHere is the basic drawing of another icon that I am presently working on. It is a panel icon of Jesus Christ with Joseph, the Patriarch of the Old Testament.