Reviews

Online reviews of some of my books:

The Divine FamilyAbout The Divine Family: Experiential Narratives

Josh Baker (Author of Please Don’t Remove MarGreat’s Glasses): “From the moment I read the opening commentary from Pope Urban VII on private revelations, I knew I was in for something special. Each of the author’s personal accounts (peira) are beautifully conveyed in a style which will leave even the most pious reader feeling unworthy to eavesdrop on these intimate revelations.

“The pure reverence and humility in which these accounts are presented filled me with hope, and softened my natural scrutiny of the extraordinary. After reading the touching forward remarks and witnessing the author’s devotion to The Feast of the Father of All Mankind, I knew there was clearly something special within these pages. I was surprised and delighted to have this peace of mind early on, as it allowed me to enjoy the gifts of this book without distraction. And what gifts they turned out to be!

“Each of the author’s descriptions were compelling both spiritually and intellectually, leaving me to ponder their content well after I had finished reading. What struck me most was how timeless the tenets of our faith are. Faith, Hope and Love are as important and applicable now as they ever have been. Names, dates, locations and societies may change, but we remain sinners who need the redemptive love of God the Father. The dates when these revelations were experienced by the author is of no importance. Through reading these accounts, it becomes clear that the only measure of time one needs to be concerned with is eternity.

“I recommend these experiential narratives to all of the faithful. You will be blessed by their message.”

Carol d’Annunzio (Author of Simple Catholic Living): “Before sharing my thoughts on the book I want to mention that I am not going to state my belief or lack of belief in the narratives described in this book. Each person who reads the book can decide for him or herself whether or not he or she believe the words contained therein. It is not my place to judge either way and I will leave my comments to the actual content of the book.

“Having said that, The Divine Family is a short (84 pages), beautifully written book that describes the Archangels Michael and Rafael, the Blessed Virgin and Jesus. It also describes Satan and vividly points out that hell is very real and that it only takes one moral sin for us to go there. The author even directly questions non-believers who may be reading the book and one of the questions she asks is, “Do you really want to wait until you are dead to find out whether all this [hell] is true?” More importantly, though, the book, through the experiences of the author, reminds us how deeply we are loved and cherished by the Holy Trinity and the Blessed Virgin Mary.

“In sharing her experiences, the author relates her experience of the power of the Sacrament of Confession and her experience of the illumination of conscious (something spoken about by many mystics). She also relates several experiences of communication with the Virgin Mary, Jesus, God the Father and the Holy Spirit. As I read these experiences, I could almost tangibly feel God’s love.

“There wasn’t anything in the book that struck me as being doctrinally unsound or contrary to Catholic faith and morals. So, even if the experiences aren’t true, they are worth reading because I am sure they will lift your heart up to the Triune God, as it did for me.”

Other reader reviews:

  • “Beautiful and moving”
  • “Very well written and full of amazing experiences”
  • “Powerful, inspiring”
  • “Well written and experiences are expressed in clear, easy descriptions”
  • “It is striking”
  • “Consumed it…could not put it down…must read it again and again.”

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About Deification of Man in Christianity

Deification Front Cover“Although very concise, this small book offers a very good introduction to the Deification/Theosis of man, the very purpose of all our lives, particularly from the Eastern Orthodox perspective. It is replete with credible references, both biblical and from respected Eastern Orthodox saints, that together provide a sound basis for the postulation of the author, who here in this book attempts to represent the overarching view of the Eastern church to those less familiar or completely unacquainted. The book is readable within a couple of hours . . . [it] is recommended for those that would like a better understanding of Theosis but without having to encounter all the accompanying extraneous theological baggage.”

(Source: Amazon.co.uk)

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Thoughts for the dayAbout Thoughts for the Day: Reflections for the Soul

Lucinda Berry Hill (Author of Coffee with Jesus: 52 Weeks of Inspiration): “In this book are many scripture based thoughts. I found comfort in being reminded of how much God loves me. I found inspiration to always try to improve on myself. And I found encouragement in the thoughts of our future in Heaven. Great book to pick up and read on a daily basis.”

Eileen Granfors (Author of five novels): “Marcelle Bartolo-Abela urges the world’s people to take time every day to honor their creator. The text of “Thoughts for the Day: Reflections for the Soul” offers insight into Catholicism and what being a true Christian means in the author’s view. While I do not share the author’s faith, I found the book easy to read and follow. Many of the meditations or reflections work to inspire a closer examination of one’s purpose in life and place in the universe, no matter what religion you are.

“Something I would like to see in future editions is an expansion upon each meditation. Maybe a page for the reader to write some thoughts and then upon turning the page, the author’s explanation of that particular reflection in life. The book contains many beautiful quotes, allusions, and thoughts. I believe this is a Christian-niche book that could find a wider audience if the author wrote an introduction explaining the purpose of meditation across religious bounds.”

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